Wednesday, November 09, 2016

Trump

 I gotta admit, the few times I genuinely feel good are the times when everyone else is suffering. Taking any kind of pleasure from someone else's misery is never ok in any kind of situation, but it's a raw feeling most of us have experienced. It's with age, wisdom, and maturity that we learn that it's not ok and that instead of laughing at someone, you help them. I have no doubt that this habit is rooted in some dysfunctionality that is tied to my own traumas, so I stop to reflect on it here and there. I've been going back and forth emotionally for the better part of the day because of what happened and what it means. From what I can see, the majority of folks in my circles are stunned and shocked that he won. They can't comprehend that a vile person would be this popular or that a chunk of people not only identified with him but also embraced him.

I know we live in a bubble here in California, but come on, I'm more shocked at the fact that y'all are shocked. I know we all tend to stay in our lane when it comes to the kind of folks we surround ourselves with but come on now, don't be so gullible. I'm not gonna say that I predicted he'd win, but I also didn't take him for a complete joke either. There is genuine hatred and fear by a lot of folks in this country when they think about folks like me coming up and taking their share.

Growing up undocumented forces you to see things differently, but it wasn't that experience that helped me process what happened and why it happened. No, like a lot of things in my life, it was pop-culture that helped me make the connections and see what was really going on and how we all got here, which is why I'm not surprised or devastated like most folks. And it goes without saying that while I may be an immigrant and Latino, I'm still a man and that makes things a lot easier for me because of the way society works. I'll get by one way or another. It also doesn't mean I don't feel some kind of way about it either.

Like a lotta other folk out there who are Dacamented, my first thoughts were of my work permit and what is going to happen. Is he going to end the DACA program? If he does, what's going to happen to everyone who is on the government's radar? Are we going to be wrangled up and deported because we were part of a work program? Will we get to keep our current status or better yet, transition into something more permanent? The obvious answers that yeah, chances are DACA is going to get cut off and that we'll be exposed to our worst fears.

The reactions I'm seeing from those in the same boat as me doesn't instill any kind of hope, with the exception of those who organize and are active in social justice spaces. I saw messages from reporters over social media asking those who have DACA for interviews. I did one of those interviews while I was lifted, so while I can't say that it'll make it on air, it did help me process a bit. I reflected on the last time I felt this kind of uncertainty back in 2010 when the Federal Dream Act didn't pass. It's a sickening feeling that can easily overwhelm you if you are not in the right frame of mind or lack support networks. It also goes without saying that in the last six years, I've made strides and matured to a point where I'm able to deal with feelings and situations like these in a healthy and positive way.

It's a battle to stay in that kind of mindset when depression is comforting, especially when others are depending on you. So like everyone else, I'll do me and process this new reality. I'll binge eat, read some comics, go on a bike ride, and play some video games. I'll do those things knowing that I'll be preparing for the fights that are coming and to support those who'll need it. This is not my country nor do I have any delusions about being accepted and assimilated. I've invested the better part of my life in this country and for me to leave, by choice, would be letting down everyone else who needs support and calls this country home.

Tomorrow is another day and when you are ready to fight, hit me up and I'll be there to support.









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